Home » Archive

Reviews articles

Arts and Life, Reviews »

21 Aug 2014 | No Comments | By Ryan Permison, Columnist
Transformers: Age of Extinction The war between the Autobots and the Decepticons rages on in “Transformers: Age of Extinction”. Set five years after the events of the last film, struggling inventor Cade Yeager (Mark Wahlberg) brings in a truck that he can sell for parts to make ends meet. But, this is no ordinary truck, it’s Optimus Prime (voiced by Peter Cullen). Most of the Autobots have been wiped out because the humans want them gone forever. A new weapon has been created by scientists using Cybertronian technology that could wipe out the human race. Optimus Prime, his allies and Cade’s family try to stop this impending […] Read the full story »

Arts and Life, Features, Headline, Reviews »

4 May 2014 | 2 Comments | By Jonathan Munshaw, Editor-in-chief
Although I love them, All Time Low is not one of my top five favorite bands. Still, when I left their show Saturday night, I couldn’t help but think about how great they really are. Unfortunately, I have never seen Blink-182 in concert before, but if I had, I would imagine it’d be something like seeing All Time Low. This is a legitimate live rock band. On the last day of their “A Love Like Tour,” the band returned home to Baltimore and played about 22 songs. You’d never know that they had been touring since February, including concerts all over Europe. Front man and guitarist Alex […] Read the full story »

Arts and Life, Columns, Reviews »

19 Apr 2014 | No Comments | By Laura Antonucci, Columnist
The first of five novels, “The Electric Church” is a thrill ride. Author Jeff Somers doesn’t coddle the readers by softening the world in which he puts his characters, the language they use or way they live. It’s a harsh, caustic and unapologetic introduction to the main character of Avery Cates, and the fun is just beginning. Dystopian is a nice way of describing the world Avery Cates functions within. Post-apocalyptic despotic police state would be more specific. However, I prefer to call it a conglomerate hellhole. Something happened to the world and now major cities have been flattened and rebuilt haphazardly by gangsters, poor people and […] Read the full story »

Arts and Life, Columns, Reviews »

6 Apr 2014 | No Comments | By Laura Antonucci, Columnist
“Building Stories” by Chris Ware is technically a graphic novel, but it sure does not look like the typical graphic novel. In fact, when you come across it in the store, nothing about it looks typical. “Building Stories” is a box that is a foot and a half high, a foot wide, and an inch and half thick. And when you open the big huge box, you see that there are 14 different pieces in a variety of sizes and mediums. These pieces make up the novel itself. “Building Stories” is about a woman and the various buildings she lives her life in, but the stories don’t […] Read the full story »

Arts and Life, Columns, Reviews »

6 Apr 2014 | No Comments | By Eva Niessner, Staff Writer
A housewife living in the 1950s, a lesbian in early-2000s New York City and Virginia Woolf – it sounds like the beginning of a ‘walked into a bar’ joke. But the lives of these three women are connected despite their outward differences in “The Hours,” and all of them have one thing in common, the novel “Mrs. Dalloway.” Virginia Woolf (Nicole Kidman), living in the 1920s, is struggling with poor mental health and no one at that time being able to understand her illness. She feels trapped and writing is her only outlet. As she works on writing “Mrs. Dalloway,” she must deal with the expectations of […] Read the full story »

Arts and Life, Features, Headline, Reviews, Video »

Commentary: Dustin Lynch
30 Mar 2014 | No Comments | By Brandi Bottalico, Senior Editor
The only problem at the Campus Activity Board’s Country Concert Friday night was trying to clap with a beer in your hand. Opener Brent Rupard, who has previously opened for Scotty McCreery and The Band Perry, played some upbeat songs that make me want to drive on back roads and roll my window down. Headliner Dustin Lynch began with “She Cranks my Tractor,” which was released on his 2012 album, then followed it up with “Dancing in the Headlights.” Lynch said he was playing a spring break-inspired setlist, which became obvious when he incorporated covers of old time club favorites “Rock Your Body,” by Justin Timberlake, and […] Read the full story »

Arts and Life, Columns, Reviews »

26 Mar 2014 | One Comment | By Sydney Adamson, Associate Art Director
If you ask any technology user, they’ll agree that emojis have become an important part of modern communication. Many of us use them everyday in text messages, tweets and Instagram captions. Personally, I’ve had text message conversations that contain no words at all, just emojis. If you don’t know what emojis are, they’re tiny icons you can add to text that are available for various smart phones like iPhone and Android. Emojis can include anything from a simple smiley face, a bride, a pizza slice to a crying cat… you name it, and there’s probably an emoji of it. But recently, emojis and real life collided in […] Read the full story »

Arts and Life, Columns, Reviews »

26 Mar 2014 | No Comments | By Taylor Seidel, Columnist
The next restaurant on the list of GoodEats was Miss Shirley’s Café.  Miss Shirley’s has three locations throughout greater Baltimore and its surrounding areas.  There is one on Cold Spring Lane, another in the Inner Harbor off of Pratt Street and the last in Annapolis on Park Place. Miss Shirley’s is a breakfast-lover’s paradise.  Open daily only until mid-afternoon (3 p.m. on weekdays and 3:30 p.m. on weekends), you have to make it a point to wake up a little earlier to indulge in these brunch specialties. The restaurant is modernly furnished and beautifully simplistic inside. The food is immaculate.  The restaurant boasts sinful creations combined with […] Read the full story »

Arts and Life, Columns, Reviews »

23 Mar 2014 | One Comment | By Ryan Permison, Columnist
Video game adaptations don’t have the best track record at the box office. Most of them are better off as video games, since they may not have use for narrative. But, with a name like this, I think we can make an exception. The popular franchise “Need for Speed” from EA Games has come to the big screen. The story is set in upstate New York, where former racecar driver Tobey Marshall (Aaron Paul) works on performance cars along with his friends. After a race that ends with the tragic death of one of Tobey’s friends, he is framed for the crime and spends two years in […] Read the full story »

Arts and Life, Reviews »

22 Mar 2014 | No Comments | By Ashley Beall, Assistant Video Producer
Veronica Roth created a unique, dystopian society in her novel “Divergent.” Chicago is now separated into five different factions, each of which promotes certain core values – such as honesty or intelligence. At 16 years old, everybody takes a test to see where they belong in this society, and afterward can choose which faction they would like to be a member of. With the crazy popularity of book-to-movie adaptations, it’s no surprise that “Divergent” got a blockbuster of its own. In case you haven’t read the books, the film begins with a clichéd voice-over, mapping out the exposition for the film. With such a complicated societal system, […] Read the full story »